Take the available amount of social-democratic longing for government and mix it up profusely with the power of German people's party and great industrial power (with a dose of cunning clever use as a binder), pour a few drops of democratic oil over it, and leave it overnight. >> read more

The film industry uses the election campaign to rid the film of the excitement tax: it shows in the cinemas every day to hundreds of thousands of voters the proverb: "Eh you choose them, ask the party: Are films tax-free?" >> read more

The father (takes the newspaper in his hand): "This Saukorps, the Polack, a naughty gang, well, they'll be homed on, oh, the Pestalozzi, they have celebrated enough now, I do not know, that is now just such a fashion, formerly you did not know anything about him and we came through school anyway ... >> read more

Money of course. And for what? To explain this can not be done without a small historical digression. Napoleon I took away his sovereignty from a number of German princes. For this, in the year 1815, she compensated the King of Prussia by lending them a kind of half-sovereignty, the "sovereignty of the nobility". >> read more

These convicts are the victims of sacrifices made by the ministers, secret councils and officers to the God "public opinion". They have been abandoned by the backers, betrayed: a lost heap. >> read more

Should this be lawful in future in Prussia that the police, if one of their rules by a small group of people really or supposedly not obeyed, suddenly block entire neighborhoods, pop into the windows, totally uninvolved people tug from apartments, with rubber truncheons lame and crooked to beat and shoot down as a game? >> read more

... the most beautiful flowers drives the competing envy in the struggle between Social Democrats and Communists. The term "fat cat" looks like being stroked by soft hands, and "hypocrite" is almost a caress, "chatter of the SPD" is used as a scientific-factual statement, and "demagoguery" is worn out and outdated. >> read more

Welcome with fascist greetings and handshake, speeches, revelry and what belongs to it. This "fraternization between Bolsheviks and fascists" was, of course, for the social-democratic newspapers a well-fed. >> read more

Fritz Lang, the director of the "Metropolis" film and other equally monumental and kitschy celluloid strips, discovers a young actress, Miss Dyers. He is contractually committed to six years and ensures her a year-to-year rising salary ... >> read more

Today, three things are needed to wage war: poison gas, dynamite for the explosive projectiles, and oil for the operation of ship and aircraft engines. In Germany, these three means of warfare are produced in the factories and laboratories of Chemietrustes, I.-G. Paint industry A.-G. >> read more